Skip to content

SANParks.org Forums

View unanswered posts | View active topics






Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 8 of 33
 [ 485 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 ... 33  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:52 am 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 830
Location: Brazil
Finally managed to finish another posting... Busy days...

We finally arrived in Skukuza, quite a different camp from Pretoriuskop, but very nice, with the nice view of the river, even from the restaurant. It was an unexpected pleasure to eat while listening to hippos down in the river. Hippos are always complaining with each other, aren’t they?

And what about the Wahlberg's Epauletted Fruit Bats under the roof of the store? Fantastic!

Here is the list of what we saw in Skukuza: Hippos (Hippopotamus amphibius), 1 Greater Blue-eared Starling (Lamprotornis chalybaeus), 1 Laughing Dove (Streptopelia senegalensis), Wahlberg's Epauletted Fruit Bats (Epomophorus wahlbergi), Vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus, previously Cercopithecus aethiops), 1 Blue Headed Southern Tree Agama (Acanthocercus atricollis), 1 Striped Skink (Trachylepis striata), 1 Cape Dwarf Gecko (Lygodactylus capensis).
Here is a picture of one of the complaining hippos.

Image

The most dangerous animal in Africa! It kills more people than all the usual suspects. I just remembered a story I read about a guy that got off his car near hippo pool, near Crocodile Bridge camp. People are allowed to leave the car there when a ranger is present. But this guy left the car with no ranger in sight. When the ranger asked him what was he doing and warned him about the danger posed by hippos, he just said that they looked such sympathetic animals. There are really some people that do not know what they are into when in KNP.

I always think it is amazing when they open their big mouths like that. It really shows how powerful they are. When they close their mouths, it is more than 1 ton in weight.

Image

Finally, the hippo’s collaboration to the butt calendar. Look at the recently cured wound in his side. Probably, it is the result of another hippo. Although vegetarians, hippos can also resort to cannibalism, as recently discovered. But it is not the case here. It is more likely that this was a fight.

Image

Unfortunately, these fantastic animals are vulnerable according to the IUCN Red List, with decreasing populations.

It was also nice to see one more starling species in the Skukuza restaurant, a Greater Blue-eared Starling.

Image

The populations of this bird are stable and, for this reason, its classification in the IUCN Red List is Least Concern.

This starling eats a variety of insects, fruit and small invertebrates, foraging in trees and on the ground, but it certainly enjoys some free food provided by humans. That’s why we find it in the camps, trying to steal the bread we leave unattended in our table!

You took only one picture of this gorgeous Laughing Dove, in the wooden floor of Skukuza restaurant, while we were having fun watching the hippos. I do think they are beautiful animals.

Image

This small pigeon has a wide distribution, being a resident breeder in Sub-Saharan tropical Africa, the Middle East, even reaching the Indian Subcontinent. They also reached a specific part of Western Australia, around Perth and Freemantle, as introduced birds, probably traveling with ships or alike. They are abundant in southern Africa, where it is found everywhere except coastal Mozambique.

It is difficult to differentiate males and females morphologically. They are very similar. It is possible to tell juveniles from adults, however, because the former are more rufous and have reduced throat spotting.

Why are they called Laughing Doves. Just listen here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:S-senegalensis.ogg

Maybe they are mocking us! Just kidding...

This bird is not threatened. Their populations are stable and may even increase, due to the fact that it has benefited greatly from habitat disturbance by humans and changes in land use. It is an extremely common animal, found in all types of woodlands, as well as suburban parks and gardens, one of the fortunate ones that benefit from our humanly impacted environments.

We have read about the Wahlberg's Epauletted Fruit Bats at the Skukuza shop. So, when we got to the shop, we eagerly looked for them. It is worth doing so. They look incredible sleeping at the roof outside the shop, as the pictures show.

Image

Image

This bat is not threatened, showing stable populations, according to the IUCN Red List. It is a species of megabat classified in the family Pteropodidae. The name of the species comes from the erectable hair structures that look like epaulettes and form around the large scent glands in the males. We can see them clearly in the second picture. Look at the white structures in front of the ears.

We can also tell males from females by looking at the air sacs in the neck that may increase the volume of courtship calls.

They are found across southern Africa in forest, shrubland, and savanna habitats. The range of distribution goes from the sea level up to 2,000 m. We can also find populations in wooded urban areas and roosting in man-made structures. So, here we have another species that can adjust to our modified environment and is, thus, more likely to survive our disturbances.

This is a frugivorous bat (really not surprising, it is a fruit bat), eating figs, guava and various fruits of Diospyros species. They also eat leaves from Balanites species and several insects.

Finally, a curious thing about this bat is that its flight is relatively slow and somewhat clumsy. They often bump into other individuals and obstacles.

Vervet monkeys are also abundant in Skukuza. They are always a guarantee of a good time. In the first picture below, we can see my wife, Carol, looking at one of them.

Image

I was astonished with the color of their genitals. This blue even looked human-made. I had never read before about that and was really surprised to see.

Image

And, finally, one of the guys eating.

Image

Vervet monkeys are not in danger of extinction. When I discover this of a primate, I am always happy. Their populations are stable and, thus, they are classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List.

It was just recently that the classification of vervet monkeys was updated, with all of the species being moved from the genus Cercopithecus to a new genus, Chlorocebus (See Cawthon Lang KA. 2006 January 3. Primate Factsheets: Vervet (Chlorocebus) Taxonomy, Morphology, & Ecology . <http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/factsheets/entry/vervet>. Accessed 2012 October 12.).

This is a sexually dimorphic species, with males being larger than females. They are equally comfortable on the ground and in the trees, being regarded as semi-terrestrial and semi-arboreal. During the day, they feed and travel on the ground and at night they retreat to the trees in order to sleep. Finally, I’d like to mention that their lifespan has not been conclusively ascertained due to the high rates of predation in the long-term study areas. However, between 11 and 12 years, serious health problems are seen in captive vervets, what can make us think that this is probably the upper limit of their lifespan.

The picture is not good, but, as far as I remember, this was the only time we saw a Blue Headed Southern Tree Agama. So, it is worth including it here.

Image

This lizard is listed in the IUCN Red List as Least Concern due to its large distribution across eastern and southern Africa, its tolerance of anthropogenic environments, and the absence of any major widespread threat. They live in a wide range of habitats, from forest to savannah, including human-modified areas. It can often be found scaling the sides of plants, as we saw this one. Normally a male displaying his colors, as the one we saw, won’t be far away from several females. These lizards tend to live in colonies with one dominant male and a group of females and other subordinate males. However, we did not see other individuals, just this one.

Another nice lizard we saw in Skukuza was this Striped Skink.

Image

This is a Scincidae lizard widespread in southern Africa. Their tails are often missing due to predators. It feeds on small insects and other small invertebrates. This lizard is a great exception in the world fauna: it has not been assessed in the IUCN Red List. But, as it is able to explore human environment, I would guess it is not threatened.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:09 am 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 9918
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
Another lovely drive in the Park charbel! :dance:

Hippos really are very dangerous animals, although they look so calm! :whistle:

Beautiful picture of the Laughing Dove. One seldom pays attention to them, but they are awesome! :D

Great shot of the Fruit Bats too! Their calls sound like a windmill that needs some oil! Fascinating! :thumbs_up:

Beautiful pictures of the Agama and Striped Skink too! Thanks for sharing! :D

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:21 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:09 pm
Posts: 3838
Location: Pretoria, SA
FAC Member (2013)
Award: Newcomer of the Year (2012)
Great sightings charbel :clap: :clap: .

Love the pic's of the Agama and Striped Skink :thumbs_up:

Thanks for sharing :thumbs_up: .

_________________
Always be humble and understanding


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:35 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 830
Location: Brazil
Thanks, friends.
I'll soon post something more exciting because on the road not on the camp....
Had a busy week but now can finally go back to the TR

Cheers
Charbel


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:41 pm 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 11:46 am
Posts: 1967
Location: Pretoria North
Hi Charbel, glad you have time again to TR.

Enjoying all the info and I love learning something new! Keep it coming!

_________________
Stop the MADNESS or Imagine RhiNOs!
Our natural heritage is being stolen from us one by one!
Make your voice heard and please support a Rhino Project!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2011 6:22 pm
Posts: 889
Location: Centurion, Gauteng
Award: Angel of the Year Award: Small Parks Promoter of the Year (2012)
Hi charbel

Thanks for all the bits of info :thumbs_up:

Sometimes we forget the other animals that are also threatened.

Love all your bird sightings and the bum shots for a calender sounds wonderful idea

Your iternary for KTP :thumbs_up:

:clap: :clap: :clap:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 11:42 pm 
Offline
Senior Virtual Ranger
Senior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2011 8:58 am
Posts: 4450
Location: Far South in South Africa.
:dance: Charbel :clap: What a wonderful TR and pic's :clap:

Thank you for being a "teacher" :thumbs_up:

_________________
"Lose yourself in Nature and find Peace!" (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
UNITE AGAINST POACHING...What we protect,
do not let poachers take it away!

Extinction is forever and survival is up to---every last one of us!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:55 am 
Offline
Legendary Virtual Ranger
Legendary Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:47 pm
Posts: 13487
Location: meandering between senility and menopause
FAC Member (2013)
Charbel, great to see you back again.

I agree the vervet genitals are actually an extremely pretty colour. They are not shy of displaying them either, particularly when aggresive. I find vervets very good looking animals.

Love you hippo picture, you really captured a good moment there.

:popcorn:

_________________
The bird doesn't sing because it has answers, it sings because it has a song.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:42 am 
Offline
Virtual Ranger
Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 5:26 pm
Posts: 1276
Location: Cape Town
Great sightings! The bats are always fascinating!

_________________
Trip Report 2014 April: Kruger Park Family Adventure


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 5:05 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 830
Location: Brazil
Thanks for all the comments, friends. Even though part of my job is to teach, besides doing research in biology, what I am doing here is mostly sharing, since as I go through the TR I get curious about the animals, and then begin to search here and there in order to learn. So, more than teach, I am sharing my learning… It’s been a nice experience to learn about the animals after seeing them. For Kgalagadi, I will try to do this before for the animals I do not know much about… Well, anyway, I get from the messages that you are enjoying this sharing… Thus, I will go on in the same vein.

We left Skukuzaa after a late lunch to do as much of the Sabie loop as we could in the end of the afternoon. We managed to reach the Maroela loop through the Skukuza-Tshokwane Road (H1-2), and, after entering the loop we went down to its end and then came back to Skukuza through H1-2.

At H1-2 up to Maroela loop, we saw: a group of impalas, 1 Chacma Baboon (Papio ursinus), 1 Pied Kingfisher (Ceryle rudis) (at the bridge over the Sabie river), 2 African Pied Wagtails (Motacilla oguimp) (from the bridge), 4 hippos (from the bridge), 2 Hamerkops (from the bridge), 1 Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola) (from the bridge), 1 Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) (from the bridge; it was a busy day at the Sabie river), 1 male Kudu, 1 Shongololo (African Giant Millipede) (Archispirostreptus gigas) (at the bridge over the Sand river), 1 female Giant Kingfisher (Megaceryle maximus), and another group of Impalas.

In the Maroela loop, we saw not much, only 2 Crested Francolins (Dendroperdix sephaena).

And when coming back to Skukuza through H1-2, we saw: 1 Lioness (from a large distance), 1 unindentified Francolin (bad notes in my entries), 1 Pied Kingfisher, 3 Marabou Storks (Leptoptilos crumeniferus), and 2 Blacksmith Lapwings (Plovers).

This baboon was alone at the top of a tree nearby the bridge over the Sabie river. Probably, it was part of a troop that was scattered at that place, but we saw no other animal from the troop.

Image

Nice to know that Chacma baboons have stable populations, and we should have for now least concern about their extinction. This is yet another species that can live along with humans and explore our resources, and this is in fact responsible for conflicts between humans and baboons, as forumites from South Africa certainly know and probably experienced. At the first part of the trip, in Capetown, we saw when out of the town the signs for phone numbers to call if one was experiencing “baboon problems”. And at the Good Hope Cape, we saw a troop baboons playing hard on someone’s car. Well, we can complain, but we are the ones who have been invading their habitats with our houses.

Baboons deserve, anyhow, our deep respect. They are very smart animals, and there is even a nice book entitled Baboon Metaphysics, by the great behavioral scientists Dorothy Cheney and Robert Seyfarth, which tries to understand how the social minds of baboons evolve. I do recommend: http://www.amazon.com/Baboon-Metaphysic ... etaphysics

Over the bridge that crosses the Sabie river, we saw this Pied Kingfisher. As the picture shows, Pied Kingfishers have a black and white plumage that makes it impossible to confuse this medium-sized bird with other kingfishers. Males have black crest and crown, white stripe above the eye, black larger stripe across the eye extending on nape, and white throat and collar. Females have only one breast band, narrower than male and also broken in the middle. The bird we saw was a male.

Image

I just found an amazing site I did not know before, where we can listen to the call of many birds. In this link you can listen to several calls by the Pied Kingfisher: http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Ceryle-rudis

This is one of the most common kingfishers in the world. It is found in many areas of Africa and Eurasia and lives in a wide range of aquatic habitats, as long as there are small fish, including streams, rivers, lakes, temporary pans, estuaries, temporarily flooded areas and rocky coasts. Fishes are their main food (as they are for kingfishers in general, the name of the species witnessing this). Invertebrates can supplement their diet. Pied kingfishers spot prey by either sitting on perches, as this one we photographed was doing, or hovering, something that this species does more than any other kingfisher. When they catch the prey, they beat it prey to death and then swallow it. It is a cooperative breeder, i.e., the breeding pair is assisted by alloparental helpers, who can either be offspring, or unrelated birds which failed to breed.

Pied Kingfishers are not threatened (Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, unknown population trend). They are locally affected in southern Africa by endosulfan, a poison used to kill tsetse flies. Its population is also impacted by poisons used to kill fish and Red-billed queleas.

From the bridge over the Sabie we also saw 2 African Pied Wagtails, with their nice black and white patterning, which can be seen in the picture below.

Image

The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as common in much of its range. The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats. It is then classified as Least Concern regarding their extinction, in the IUCN Red List.

Here are some calls from African Pied Wagtails, rather beautiful: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?qu ... pecies_nr=

African Pied Wagtails are found across much of sub-Saharan Africa. They generally prefer wide rivers, like the Sabie, and other water bodies with sandy banks or scattered boulders. However, they can also be found in rocky coastlines. One of the reasons these birds have been facing our threats well is that it manages to survive and even be common in man-made habitats, such as parks, playing fields, golf courses, suburban gardens and sewage works. In particular, this species has benefited from the construction of dams.

They mainly eat insects, especially flies but their diet also includes other invertebrates, grass seeds, tadpoles, small fish and scraps of human food. They are monogamous, territorial solitary nesters, chasing intruders out of its territory. A curiosity is that they are so eager to defend their territories that they even attack their reflections in car mirrors. During the day they are usually seen alone or in pairs but gather in communal roosts in the evenings.

Another great sighting in the Sabie river was a show of hippos interacting. It was a great moment captured by our cameras, one of the highlights of the whole trip. There he was, just besides the vegetation, a big hippo (we guessed it was a big male) just watching the scene. Look at his eyes. Frightening! What a stare!

Image

And then there was this girl (as we guessed) swimming calmly in the river….

Image

But then she offered such a dramatic display!

Image

And then he emerged, a little young hippo, playing with (we assumed) his or her mother.

Image

Image

Image

When we see then like this, we can (almost) forget how they can be dangerous… Anyway, lovely creatures!

The Sabie river was quite busy that day! We also saw this Hamerkop moving from the rocks to the water.

Image

Image

As I wrote many things about Hamerkops before in the TR, I will only add that their calls can be heard at: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?qu ... pecies_nr=

Quite noisy and interesting birds!

There we saw also this Wood Sanpiper.

Image

Here are their delicate calls: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?qu ... pecies_nr=

The Wood Sandpipers spend their breeding season in a broad band of forest tundra from Iceland and Scotland across Eurasia to Siberia, but they head south in the non-breeding season to Australia, South-East Asia, India and sub-Saharan Africa. It is found in a wide range of open freshwater habitats, shallow sewage ponds, dams, pans, flood plains, marshes and muddy edges of water courses. However, it is largely absent from tidal coastal habitats. It feeds on a variety of insects, other invertebrates and small fish and frogs. Most of its foraging is done by slowly walking on the ground or in shallow water, probing, pecking and sweeping its bill from side to side in search of prey. That’s what this bird was doing when we found it.

This bird is not threatened. It is a widespread species, classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, with stable populations. Only in Russia, its estimated population amounts to 1.2 million breeding pairs. It is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.

Another animal we saw from the bridge in the Sabie river was a Nile Crocodile, which we can see in the picture below.

Image

Nile Crocodiles are registered in the IUCN Red List as Lower Risk/Least Concern, but the website says this information needs updating.

They are the largest crocodilians in Africa. Sometimes they are regarded as the second largest crocodilian after the saltwater crocodile. Like all crocodiles they are sexually dimorphic, with the males up to 30% larger than the females. The males measure from 3.5 to 5 metres (11 to 16 ft) long, but very old adults can grow to 5.5 m (18 ft) or more. Mature females, in turn, measure 2.4 to 4 m (7 ft 10 in to 13 ft 1 in). The largest accurately measured male had 6.47 m (21.2 ft) and weighed about 1,090 kg (2,400 lb). But such giants are rare today, due to heavy hunting mostly in the 1940s and 1950s.

Another curious sighting was this Kudu with a broken horn. Probably the result of some fight.

Image

Image

I am not sure if I already gave this information, but Greater Kudus are not threatened, showing stable populations. But threatens must be coming on the horizon: they are sparsely populated in most areas, due to a declining habitat, deforestation and hunting. They have, in fact, both benefited and suffered with human interaction: while on the one hand they are a target for hunters and we have destroyed woodland cover which they use for their habitat, on the other wells and irrigation set up by humans has also allowed the greater kudus to occupy territory where they would not survive due to lack of water.

I ate Kudu meat in the Kruger, with a feeling of guilt, even though we read in websites that the Kudu meat we eat come from breeds culled under strict control. It would be great to know more about that, if someone has additional information.

Finally, the female Giant Kingfisher we saw in this first stretch of the Sabie loop.

Image

Unfortunately, in xeno-canto there is only a short recording of the Giant Kingfisher call: http://www.xeno-canto.org/browse.php?qu ... pecies_nr=

Even though this species is still Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, it is unfortunate that its population trend is one of decreasing. Although it is common in protected areas such as Kruger, loss of potential nest sites in other regions, due to loss of habitat, is a probable reason for the decline of their populations.

The species occurs across much of sub-Saharan Africa, and is fairly common in southern Africa, mainly in South Africa and Zimbabwe. They live in many types of aquatic habitats and feed mainly on crabs, with fish completing their diet. Both sexes excavate the nest, which is dug into vertical sandbanks and takes about 7 days to be completed. They can excavate tunnels as long as 8.45m!

Here is the lioness we saw, quietly sleeping, far away, when coming back to Skukuza.

Image

We also saw these three Marabou Storks.

Image

Image

These storks are not only classified as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, but the population trend is one of increasing. However, in South Africa, in particular, they face the threat of local extinction, due to its small population.

They occupy much of sub-Saharan Africa, largely excluding the lowland forest of West Africa. In southern Africa, it is fairly common to locally abundant in central and southern Mozambique, Zimbabwe, north-eastern South Africa, northern Botswana and central and northern Namibia. Their preference is for open semi-arid habitats and wetlands, such as pans, dams and rivers.

They are primarily scavengers, behaving in a similar manner to vultures, and indeed they even show a morphology that partly resembles vultures. They are also opportunistic hunters.

And finally we saw another Pied Kingfisher, this time very close our car, again over the bridge that crosses the Sabie river.

Image

We almost lost the gate closing time, however, due to a traffic jam over the bridge!

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2011 3:26 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Oi Charbel, grande reportagem :) .
What a great TR, great pictures and explanations as well, I'm going to follow your next inputs.
next year Im going to visit your country for the first time, going to Pantanal, have you been there? It seems to be a paradise for a birder as you seem to be.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:40 pm 
Offline
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
Distinguished Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:43 pm
Posts: 4418
Location: 116 days to go!
Fantastic hippo shots, Charbel,

and thanks for the many birdies :clap: :clap: :clap:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:10 pm 
Offline
Junior Virtual Ranger
Junior Virtual Ranger
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:22 pm
Posts: 830
Location: Brazil
Dear Pumbaa and Pedro Maia,
Thanks for the comments! Always nice to see that you are following the TR, friends.

Pedro, welcome to my country! You'll be delighted in the Pantanal. It is indeed, no doubt about it, a great place for birder, as definitely I am...

Also, a nearby biome here where I live, Bahia, the Caatinga is great for birding!

All the best
Charbel


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 7:10 am 
Offline
Forum Assistant
Forum Assistant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:39 am
Posts: 9918
Location: Pretoria SA
FAC Member (2012)
Thanks for sharing your sightings with awesome pictures, as well as your learning! I find all this information very interesting while learning at the same time! :thumbs_up:

Awesome Hippo pictures, especially the mom and baby, although the little one shows only his upper lip. I think the water is to deep for him to show more of him/herself! :D

Great shot of the Hamerkop as well as the Wood Sandpiper Charbel! Beatiful Kingfishers too. And what a big Crocodile! :clap: :clap:

I wonder what was in the riverbed or on the other side of the river ....

_________________
"Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly always a rebound from hard work." - David Grayson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Report of our first trip to Kruger - 3-14 January 2011
Unread postPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 7:57 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:09 pm
Posts: 3838
Location: Pretoria, SA
FAC Member (2013)
Award: Newcomer of the Year (2012)
Thanks for all the stunning sightings and all the additional info that goes with it :clap: :clap: :clap: .

_________________
Always be humble and understanding


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 485 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 ... 33  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: maxbullough and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Webcams Highlights

Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Addo Nossob Orpen Satara
Submitted by kyknetta at 07:46:46 Submitted by Anonymous at 09:13:31 Submitted by fenman5 at 10:41:13 Submitted by MxM at 10:14:10