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 Post subject: Imberbe Memories in a Leadwood fire May 2011
Unread postPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 6:33 pm 
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The red embers of a Leadwood fire will burn for hours, slowly releasing the warmth of a lifetime spent in the Bushveld. Blue flames jump and dance, turning in to a red glow which illuminates a small circle in the dark of the African bush. Outside the dark hides mystery and myth, danger and excitement. Staring in to the flames releases long held memories.

Come share this circle of light and warmth.


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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 8:52 pm 
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Facing death

On the open plains, beneath Nkumbe.


Image

Looking over the grass swept plains, it was a lazy sun kissed day on the little sand stone koppie where we were resting. A slight breeze in our faces cooled us down, after a long walk. Here we would rest in safety, the younger ones were tired.

Image

We had followed the age old trail, meandering from pan to pan. These pans are filled during the summer rains, and are now slowly starting to dry out as winter is approaching. From kilometres around the animals would come to drink. On the way we spent magical moments watching some elephant bulls drinking. But something told me to keep on moving.

Image

Now the sun had worked its magic and soon we were resting on the rocks, rather lazily. Just as I was about to drift of, I heard the first sound.

Panic rushed through me as I looked around to determine what was happening. A quick warning got the other's attention. The sound of approaching danger came rushing up the side of the koppie. We moved back, trying to get out of the way of danger.

Then suddenly they were there. I knew I had to face them ...

Image

When the first one spotted me I quickly moved in to cover. But still they kept on coming.

Rising up I charged ... 25 .... 20 ... at 15 meters I stopped, made myself as big as possible and roared.

The humans froze ... pointing their rifles at me ... I could see the dark cold steel.

Quickly I spun around, and moved back. But the cubs were still there!

A second time I turned around to face death ... this time my younger sister came with me.

25 ... 20 ... 15

Again I stopped ... looking death in the eye.

With all my might I shouted my defiance.

The group of humans slowly moved backwards, all the time keeping me in the eye and pointing at me with their cold metal.

Perhaps they were not there to harm?

Then, after what seemed an eternity, my sister called from the foot of the koppie. The cubs were safe ...


*********************

Meeting with a lioness during a Sand River bush camp walk, 2011.

And yes, it is my shoulder on the first photo. :wink:


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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2011 6:17 pm 
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Moments of Magic

It was late summer and we were on the last afternoon of a Sand River Bush Camp in Kruger. During the previous days we had many good experiences, but it is always nice to have that "special" encounter, which the guests can tell their friends about. Somehow we were still lacking that, and I hoped that it would change.

We left the vehicle at Manzimhlope water hole and headed down an animal path. My plan was to head slightly west away from the riverbed and then circle back to meet the river, which would take us back to the vehicle. As soon as we started walking the flies were buzzing around my head. "Better look out for buffalo" ... I thought to myself. We soon started picking up tracks. We could study a cheetah spoor, and saw some buffalo dung, giraffe and a variety of antelope spoor.

Moving through the initial drainage lines and the associated thicker vegetation we came to an open grassy area, where the terrain started rising. After a few hundred meters the round leaved teak took over. This never reaches much higher than one's shoulder height, but is a nice place for a nasty surprise. As it was getting late and we had to be back before sunset, I decided to skirt it and start heading back to the river bed.

Again moving in to thicker vegetation I soon spotted a hand full of buffalo across a small drainage line, grazing against the rise on the other side.

Hoping for a good view but knowing how sharp buffalo are and dangerous they can be, I quickly briefed the guests on safety precautions. I knew that the drainage line would offer a natural barrier, and that we should be quite safe. We started moving closer until we had a good view of the buffalo which now had grown their numbers to thirty, and which kept on increasing with time. They were however unaware of our presence. Perfect I thought ...

Watching the buffalo from a nice vantage point, we saw that some of them started lifting their heads and looking at us. Then I noticed a loner moving up the drainage line close to us. He was unaware of us, but I knew that he was getting too close. I decided to draw his attention to us, by slapping on the but of the rifle. By the time he noticed, he was too close for comfort. As luck would have it, it was just the time one of the guests started coughing. The buffalo started showing signs of irritation, and I decided it was time for a strategic retreat. By now I could see at least a hundred buffalo, all looking at us. I gave the sign and the back up took the group out to the place of safety I had previously indicated.

Now, at a safe distance we could see the herd. But they had seen enough. Sounding like a freight train they thundered away from us, running a half circle and regrouping in the open area next to the river bed. At this time we noticed a second group of some thirty buffalo at our back, and the big heard of perhaps 250 buffalo in front of us.

Now being such a considerate guide, I knew that this was the opportune time. I turned to my backup and whispered loud enough to her to allow the group to clearly hear: "Oops, there are more buffalo than I have bullets with me ..." :twisted:

This brought the necessary relieve, as the group burst in to laughter.

By now the buffalo and us had sorted out our positions. They were in a group and standing where they were comfortable, and we were comfortable with them. After watching the wall of horns for a while we moved off, heading back down the riverbed in the direction of our vehicle. The sun was setting in a warm golden glow.

Would this be the experience they would choose to share with their friends? ...

:whistle:

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2011 1:32 am 
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... moving back to the vehicle we left the wall of horns and curious stares behind. All around us we could see the signs of the herd having moved through. The area along the river bed was quite thick, and I readied myself for that unexpected loner which could still surprise us, or perhaps even a lion pride tracking the buffalo and waiting for the darkness to bring their meal. I kept a safe distance form the thickest areas where I could. Tense in anticipation.

Then we came upon one of those indescribable Kruger scenes.

The thick bush opened up and we walked in to an area in the drainage line covered with lush green grass. On the banks the golden green trunks of sycamore figs stretched in to the sky, forming a canopy over our heads. The last warm rays of the sun painted the scene with magic.

We stopped and the group stood in amazement, not moving nor saying a word. Silence filled our ears. Not a bird, nor even the wind disturbed our wonder. So simple, yet no master painter could create such beauty.

This is what I will remember.

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 12:32 pm 
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Imberbe wrote:
Facing death

On the open plains, beneath Nkumbe.


Image

Looking over the grass swept plains, it was a lazy sun kissed day on the little sand stone koppie where we were resting. A slight breeze in our faces cooled us down, after a long walk. Here we would rest in safety, the younger ones were tired.

Image

We had followed the age old trail, meandering from pan to pan. These pans are filled during the summer rains, and are now slowly starting to dry out as winter is approaching. From kilometres around the animals would come to drink. On the way we spent magical moments watching some elephant bulls drinking. But something told me to keep on moving.

Image

Now the sun had worked its magic and soon we were resting on the rocks, rather lazily. Just as I was about to drift of, I heard the first sound.

Panic rushed through me as I looked around to determine what was happening. A quick warning got the other's attention. The sound of approaching danger came rushing up the side of the koppie. We moved back, trying to get out of the way of danger.

Then suddenly they were there. I knew I had to face them ...

Image

When the first one spotted me I quickly moved in to cover. But still they kept on coming.

Rising up I charged ... 25 .... 20 ... at 15 meters I stopped, made myself as big as possible and roared.

The humans froze ... pointing their rifles at me ... I could see the dark cold steel.

Quickly I spun around, and moved back. But the cubs were still there!

A second time I turned around to face death ... this time my younger sister came with me.

25 ... 20 ... 15

Again I stopped ... looking death in the eye.

With all my might I shouted my defiance.

The group of humans slowly moved backwards, all the time keeping me in the eye and pointing at me with their cold metal.

Perhaps they were not there to harm?

Then, after what seemed an eternity, my sister called from the foot of the koppie. The cubs were safe ...


*********************

Meeting with a lioness during a Sand River bush camp walk, 2011.

And yes, it is my shoulder on the first photo. :wink:




Oh my word I was there! :dance: :dance: :dance: I was one of the people (one of the students) walking with Imberbe. It was an amazing experience. I love the way you have described it from the lioness’s point of view. Seeing the pics reminds me of how beautiful she was!

From my perspective it was an amazing day we saw the lions tracks near the waterhole where we saw the ellies so we knew they were around. We were so privileged that we got to sit on the rocks and watch the ellies for awhile.

We went up the koppie and how I remember it being on the opposite side to the lioness is. We had three Guides (Rifles) with us Imberbe being one of them. We had two guides in front and one at the back of the group, I was the second person in the line. Us we got to the top I remember Imbere clicking and then pointing ahead I looked in that direction to see to spotted fury babies in the grass ahead of us. There was this low growling sound (you could feel it under your feet).

The next thing there was a loud snarling as a flash of gold dashed towards us. By this stage we had all three guides in front of the group I was still standing where I had been. I could see her in the gap between two of the guides. An older gentleman had grabbed my back and used me as a shield…. Nice. I just kept saying don’t run, whatever you do don’t run, I was worried that with him being that nervous flight mode would kick in and if anyone had to run things would have been very different. I remember the second lioness come from the left hand side and I remember thinking wow she has such good teeth must be young, she then disappeared we guessed she went to move the cubs. We all just listened and did whatever we were told. We backed away slowly and after awhile they started roaring and we then knew we were in the clear. I still commented afterwards on how amazing our guides were Imberbe and the other two guides whom I have known for awhile were amazing! I think that’s why I wasn't scared I knew it was under control. The professionalism was so impressive all three of them acted so fast I don’t even know how the one from the back got in front of us so fast. They had the rifles loaded and ready to go in seconds. :clap: :clap: I was more worried for the lionesses life than my own and was so grateful that the situation ended the way it did. It just reinforces “never mess with a mother”.
q

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2011 1:30 am 
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Taken for a ride ...


Have you ever had the feeling of being taken for a ride?


******************************************


When we initially became aware of the possibility of becoming involved in this event there was a rush of excitement, we were on a high! Wow, this would be so great! But would it be possible, would we be able to afford it, what if they were not taking anyone in?

The re-assuring voice on the phone quickly confirmed that it was possible, and that they would be most willing to accommodate us. The stranger was friendly, maybe too friendly?

But hey, what did we have to lose?

Stepping in to the strange new situation I felt the first wintry chill going down my spine. The people seemed so friendly and helpful. But then again, they were masters of the game, knew all the ropes, and we were mere rookies. The fact that my new partner was called Jackal should perhaps have alerted some forgotten primitive survival urge.

As soon as we got underway I realised that we were being taken down the old familiar path. This made me feel a bit concerned, even a bit rattled. Was this yet another let down? But unsure of myself and the strange situation we were now engulfed in, I decided to keep on trusting, push on and not let my concerns show. Maybe if I just hanged on and faked calm, I would get through this ...

There we were, Jackal and I, now partners on this bumpy road full of hurdles and dangers hiding undetected. After the initial apprehension I began feeling strangely calm, almost trusting this new companion of mine. I decided to let go, and simply follow his every move. It could have been so complete, if it was not for this nagging thought that I was to him probably just another passerby.

Be it as it may, Jackal were not about to let me down. Instead he took me to some amazing heights. The dizzy feeling of being on top, combined with the silent fear of not being in control, all mixed in to an amazing experience of exhilaration and wonder. Every time I thought I had seen it all, new horizons opened before me. The chills kept on rolling down my spine, like a fresh breath of mountain air rolling down the Maluti mountains. My heart was racing with the beat of a thousand Eland hooves galloping down the valley, as Jackal carried me in to his world.

I was on a high ... ready for the come down.

It was here, with Jackal stepping over another one of Golden Gate’s many sandstone rocks that I realised that he would not let me down. After all, on his sturdy back he wears the SANParks logo with pride.












Image
Jackal wears the SANParks logo on his back.


Image
Exploring the heights of Golden Gate on horse back.


Image
New horizons open before you.

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2011 2:07 am 
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Some more memories from the fire at Golden Gate.

Highlands Retreat must be one of the top SANParks facilities. Nestled high in the mountains it offers some stunning views.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 6:08 pm 
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LEFT IN THE DARK

It is early morning next to the Nwaswitshaka. Much too early for a walk. Around us the black blanket of a moonless Kruger night covers the bush. But armed with a torch or two we stumble down the animal path just vacated by a snorting black rhino. Its dung is still steaming in the cold winter air. Quickly reaching the river bed, we scramble up the relative safety of a big granite bolder in the middle of the river.

Silence ...

Only the breathing and occasional movement of the group members can be heard. Staring in to the blackness, everyone scanning the bush, vulnerable in our own blindness.

Then your senses start to adjust. You become aware of the distant sound of a Giant Eagle Owl... du, du .... du, du ... du, du, du ...

Good lord deliver us!

Good lord deliver us!

Good lord deliver us .... the Fiery-Necked Night jar calls out his early morning prayer.

With the prayer a peaceful calm descends, the soft breeze caresses you cheeks ... you become one with the bush. Just a small part of this wonderful creation.

Slowly the veil of darkness starts to lift in the east.

Du, du ...du du du du .... du, du ... du du du du

Unnoticed at first the subtle change proclaims the passing of the time of owls, in to the early morning chorus. A Ground hornbill is announcing his far off presence.

The Natal Spurfowl shatters the peace that had descended over the bush. The morning has started and they are rearing to go.

So are we.

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Last edited by Imberbe on Sun Aug 14, 2011 9:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 12:57 am 
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CHASING PHANTOMS I

The early morning breeze still carried the memories of a bushveld winters night. That evening around the fire we had heard their distant echoes, as they were proclaiming their territory.

"Wouldn't it be great if we could see them tomorrow?" was followed by a quick "You must be crazy!" The laughter and jokes subsided as everyone drifted in to their own thoughts and apprehensions.

Now we were heading in to the bush, all armed with a new shot of confidence brought about by the warm rays of sunshine on our backs. I had the route planned. We would head up the Olifants river and then swing back past the koppie, reaching camp via the old elephant highway.

The first roar changed everything.

I found myself making a 90 degree turn away from the river, followed by the jittery group. We headed up the valley in the direction of the roaring which had now become a duo. They could not be too far, not much more than a kilo in front of us.

Reaching the top of the valley I could hear them roaring just over the rim of the hill. I quickly stopped and briefed the group on what to expect and made sure that everyone was comfortable with the approach. Then we pushed over the rim to have a look ...

Nothing ...

It was as if they had melted in to the bush. Perplexed we stood for a while ... listening.

Judging the direction in which they must have moved, I started looking for spoor. Only the faintest marks confirmed my suspicions. But this would not stop us! We now had a mission. These boys would not escape!

It was not long before we heard them again. But they were moving at speed and had left us behind, puffing to catch up. Three, four times I would think that we were about to meet, just to find out that they had again left us in their dust.

I don't know exactly when it happened, but slowly my thoughts started wondering. Why are we not catching up? Why are they moving so fast? What is happening in front of us? Something was not quite what I would expect.

The lowveld sun was getting hot and the group had now travelled several kilometres at "almost" lion speed. The early excitement had now dissipated in to quiet resignation. I realised that we needed to catch up pretty soon, otherwise we would have to abandon the chase and start the long walk back to camp.

This time the roaring was different. I could make out four, perhaps even five lion. From where we stood it sounded as if they were no more than 500 meters in front of us, but dispersed over an area. Was it the pride coming together?

I knew the area ahead, and realised that we would be moving in to a dangerously thick wooded area, if we don't catch them now. This was our last chance.

Pushing forward I rallied the group and we started climbing a gentle hill. The top would offer us the best opportunity to see our quarry. Again they became quiet, almost as if they were playing with us, watching us.

Scanning the bush in front of us with every pair of binoculars, every blade examined, we realised that the phantoms had once again eluded us.

The route back to camp was filled with unspoken questions. Were they playing with us? Why were they so vocal? How close had we really been?

......

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 8:24 pm 
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CHASING PHANTOMS II

That evening around the fire was quiet. The boys seemed to have departed the area, and but for one far off echo, we heard nothing. Everyone was brave in reflection and no one would admit any hesitation in the morning's chase.

The next morning saw the group gathering for a new adventure. As soon as it became bright enough we were on our way. I chose a different direction and hoped to find some of the regular game, since nothing was to be seen during the previous day's chase. Only a fool hardy kudu or giraffe would remain in the area where a group of humans were stumbling after some very loud lion.

Having travelled no more than a kilometre we started going down the slope in to the next undulating valley. The first roar brought a smile to my face and a ripple of excitement in the group. Was this to be our day?

Little were we to know, that this would be a repeat of the previous day. Us chasing the roars which always seemed just over the next crest. But during the chase I started putting the picture together, all the bits and pieces of the past day falling in to place.

Clearly this was unusual behaviour for lion. Lion specialise in lying around and sleeping during the day. Seldom will you hear them and very seldom will you find males moving at such speeds. Unless they had reason, that is. The tracks and the roars also started to indicate that there were two groups involved. Clearly it was a battle for ownership between two coalitions of males. The three resident males were battling intruders, in an epic battle for survival.

The lion were not running from us, we were merely chasing after the battle, which was happening in full fury in front of us. Spectators in a battle for life and death.

We had reached a high plateau, and the hazy lowveld bush lay at our feet. Somewhere down there the battle would come to a conclusion. We were spent. Two days of chasing this battle had drained our energy, and we knew that it was time to return to camp.

...


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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 2:10 am 
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CHASING PHANTOMS III

We slowly started to descend down the steep incline of the plateau, all the while aware that we may still be watched. Then with the sun burning down on us, we changed direction to circle back to camp. Disappointed I tried my best to spot an elephant or buffalo, so that the group would at least have seen something besides the few antelope which had scattered in front of us during the chase. But the bush seemed empty.

Nearing the camp, I could feel the group behind me starting to loose concentration as they were hot and tired and the adrenaline had worn off. From the last koppie before the camp, an alarm call caught my attention. The baboon lookout at the top of the koppie was not happy, and though he had us in sight, his attention was directed more towards the slight rise leading away from the camp, perhaps five hundred meters away and slightly to the South of the camp.

In my mind I started the debate. Do I turn away from camp to investigate or do I lead my tired group in to camp, where they would welcome a shower and a great breakfast?

Well obviously, and to the confusion of the group, I made a turn to the South heading away from camp and started the ascent. The group started spreading out, and I stopped to bunch them closer. I told them that I believed that we could possibly still see some lion, but ... they had heard that before! They were tired and disinterested, and immediately started spreading when we moved on.

Then I got that feeling. I knew they were close.

We moved further up the rise heading towards the little valley on the other side, which I thought could offer them a hiding place. We were in the open, but the bush in front of us was thick. I could see nothing though I knew they must be there in front of us somewhere. Every nerve in my body was looking for that flick of a tail, or those little round ears.

A Swainson's spurfowl exploded from the bush to the right of where we had just passed. I turned to face the thick bush. I could not see a thing, but I knew that we had found them.

And then they were there! The boys we had been following for two days made a quick appearance as they broke cover some thirty meters from us, and started running down the valley. We could only catch glimpses of them, but these were sweet moments of joy. The phantoms had turned in to two majestic kings, fighting for a kingdom. The younger one was a huge blond male, and the older one was much darker.

Image

As we stood watching their retreat, I wondered what the future had in store for them.

Moments later they became phantoms once more, and we turned in to camp. Our chase had come full circle.

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Want to know more about the SANParks Honorary Rangers? Visit www.sanparkshr.org


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Last edited by Imberbe on Wed Aug 24, 2011 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2011 4:32 pm 
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Up a tree for the night

Oh boy! Is this going to be uncomfortable or what? Spending the night up this tree, hanging on in fear of silent predators which are scarcely detectable with day loving eyes!

It is strange how darkness brings out the worst fears in us. During the day we travel Kruger’s roads with impunity, lording it over the animals in our noisy vehicles. We don’t even give a moment’s thought to our own vulnerabilities. But at night things change. You become small, vulnerable to the slightest mistake.

They say that lion become fearless, sensing that its’ old mortal enemy is weak, almost blind when darkness falls. But the real animal which brings fear into ones’ heart is that iconic night hunter, the leopard. It happens in an instant, often without the victim even realising that death is but a breath away. The ultimate night time assassin.

With the sun silently drowning in a pool in the Sabie river, we enter the twilight zone. The last francolin has fallen silent. Desperately my eyes fight the losing battle, trying to drink in the last rays of light ... just in case something is approaching.

Finally accepting defeat, I give the old male a last fleeting glance. Nonchalantly ignoring us he scrambled up the huge Jackal berry we chose for our sundowners and is now camped up in the highest branches, surrounded by his restless troop.

Good night old man, I hope you have a restful, if somewhat uncomfortable night.

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2011 12:55 am 
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A LESSON LEARNT

The morning had been slow. We started walking from Manzimhlope water hole and headed up a clearly trampled game path, which closely followed a small drainage line heading North West. Seeing plenty of rhino spoor, we expected to meet some of these gentle giants. But clearly that was not to be.

After some considerable time I decided to cross the drainage line and head across the open veld in the direction of a small river, where I hoped to find some water, and possibly some animals. Soon we saw the ground hornbills flying up in to a tree at our approach.

After giving us a suspicious eye, they flew off with slow lumbering beats of their wings. White flashes highlighted their retreat.

Spotting a group of warthog, and knowing that they are not the sharpest pencils in the pocket, I decided to see how close we could get. We started walking in their direction, but just heading past them, so as to not give them the impression that we were coming straight towards them. They stood watching our approach as we came to within thirty meters or so. Always adjusting our direction to face them sideways, we started to circle them and moving closer all the time. After almost making a complete circle and getting as close as 20 meters, the penny finally dropped, and they sped away in full flight.

How they survive in the bush ... it's a miracle!

By this time it was starting to get warmer, and we headed in to an open area walking parallel to the river, in the direction of a nice shady spot which I knew lay ahead. The slightest of breeze had come up and was blowing in my neck.

I first thought it to be merely some big rocks, but a quick check with the binoculars confirmed that it was a group of six rhino in front of us. They were at least 400 meters ahead, lazily resting in a shady area. I quickly briefed the group on rhino behaviour and safety precautions and discussed our approach with the second rifle. We were concerned about the wind, and decided to circle around the rhino, to try and neutralise the wind. We would approach them from the back, where there was a nice rocky area which would give the ideal viewing platform.

Moving forward, we had not yet travelled thirty meters in our effort to circle the rhino, when I suddenly noted a change in their behaviour. They restlessly started milling around, and then in an instant stormed away from us, leaving only a dust cloud behind as they crossed over the ridge.

I always knew the theory of the importance of smell in the bush. But never before had I seen such a clear demonstration of the incredible power of rhino olfactory abilities! I could not for a moment believe that it was possible for the animals to smell us at that distance, but that was clearly the only explanation for what we experienced.

As the last rhino disappeared over the ridge, I decided to make a mental note or two:
1. Animals can smell .... very well!
2. Never forget this!

Little was I to know what difference this lesson would make just a day later ...

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Imberbe = Combretum imberbe = Leadwood = Hardekool = The spirit of the Wildernis!

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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2011 8:37 pm 
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Somewhat disappointed by the disappearing rhino's, we moved on. Having passed the spot where the rhino should have been, I got my second lesson for the day.

Some shapes jump out at you. After having had experiences with these animals, their shape just gets fixed in to you memory. Without thinking, without even realising what you see, you just know that they are there.

Meeting big male lions on foot is always a special occasion. But very often very fleeting.

He was lazing in the sun some fifty meters in front of us on the other side of the river bed, looking away from us. The back of his mane was dark, almost black. His magnificent body was glistening golden brown in the sun. And he was unaware of us. I knew we had a beautiful sighting and that we could get quite close.

I quickly gathered the group to point him out. Some saw him quite quickly, but most battled to see him where he lay in the open. This is when I learned my second lesson.

Humans are noisy!

Despite my best efforts the level of noise rose considerably, and within moments the male jumped up and turned to face us. Suddenly he was joined by a second male, which had been lying hidden from view behind a small bush. One look was all that was needed for them to follow the example the rhino had set. They were off at speed, glancing a last time over their shoulders, before entering a hidden part of the river bed.

Somewhat frustrated by the spoiled opportunity I marshalled the group and we made good pace to try and get a second glimpse. But they were gone from view, probably watching us from some hiding place.

_________________
Imberbe = Combretum imberbe = Leadwood = Hardekool = The spirit of the Wildernis!

Want to know more about the SANParks Honorary Rangers? Visit www.sanparkshr.org


One positive deed is worth more than a thousand critical words.


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 Post subject: Re: Memories in a Leadwood fire
Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2011 10:20 pm 
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Having a break after our lion and rhino adventures.

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Want to know more about the SANParks Honorary Rangers? Visit www.sanparkshr.org


One positive deed is worth more than a thousand critical words.


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