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 Post subject: Antelope: Bontebok
Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:59 am 
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Bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) and Blesbok (Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi) are separate subspecies of the Damaliscus pygargus.

Classification
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Genus: Damaliscus

The Bontebok
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The name bontebok comes from bont (Dutch) particolored and bok (Dutch) a buck. Bles (Dutch) a mark or blaze; bok (Dutch) a buck: alluding to the white blaze on the nose.

Bontebok stand 80 to 100 centimetres at the shoulder and weigh 50 to 90 kilograms. The Bontebok is a chocolate brown colour, with pure white buttocks and a white stripe from the forehead to the tip of the nose. Blesbok are reddish-brown with a pale brown buttock patch and the white blaze on the muzzle is broken by brown between the eyes.
The horns of Bontebok are lyre-shaped and clearly ringed they are found in both sexes. Average horn length is 38 cm.

Blesbok live in highveld where they eat short grasses, while Bontebok are restricted to coastal Fynbos and Renosterveld. They are diurnal, though they rest during the heat of the day. On hot days the herds characteristically orientate towards the sun with their head bowed.

Conservation Status
The bontebok is classified as vulnerable


Last edited by gwendolen on Tue Oct 24, 2006 6:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 8:10 am 
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Photo taken in Bontebok National Park

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 10:03 am 
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Have also seen a lot of them in a little private reserve near Durban, called Tala.
They are beautiful antelope.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:00 pm 
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Elsa wrote:
Have also seen a lot of them in a little private reserve near Durban, called Tala.
They are beautiful antelope.


Are you sure those are not blesbok which look similar to bontebok.

It looks like the one in the photo was right in the camping area, as they often are at BBK park near Swllendam.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:04 pm 
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Quote:
It looks like the one in the photo was right in the camping area


My picture was taken in the camping area of BBNP, do you mean the first pic, or Katja's?


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Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:24 pm 
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Location: Gauties .
You can find them in some areas very far from there natural cape distribution , as far as I am concerned this is totaly irresponsible as they can crossbread with blesbok which threatens the endangered bontebok due to genetic issues.

Bontebok shouldnt be allowed anywhere out there natural distribution areas , and blesbok into those areas .

Same goes for other similar species .


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 8:13 pm 
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gwendolen wrote:
Quote:
It looks like the one in the photo was right in the camping area


My picture was taken in the camping area of BBNP, do you mean the first pic, or Katja's?

Mine was taken in the camping area of BBNP too, so he is right, no matter which photo he meant. :D

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2006 1:40 am 
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i did some research on the bontebok feeding prefereance in bontebok national park and ill post it soon, but firstly the Damaliscus pygargus pygargus is a blesbok, the bontebok is Damaliscus dorcas dorcas and for interest ill post a link to the paper i submitted to UCT about their conservation status...

[edit: according to my literature that is, i have also seen bontebok described by other names and many believe that they are a sub-species, or race, resulting in worries about their interbreeding and loss of genetic seperation. A nice example of divergent evolution imo]


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2006 6:31 am 
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Yes :whistle:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2006 9:31 am 
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In the Field Guide to Mammals of Southern Africa, Chris & Tilde Stuart, 2001 they are classified as Bontebok Damaliscus dorcas dorcas, Blesbok Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi, but sources on the Internet claim these are their old names.
Bontebok are named Damaliscus pygargus on the ITIS standard report page and in the Wikipedia. In this article [pdf], the bontebok (D. p. pygargus) and blesbok (D. p. phillipsi) are classified as two subspecies of Damaliscus pygargus.

Foncusing it is.


Last edited by gwendolen on Wed May 03, 2006 9:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2006 11:12 am 
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Bush Baptist wrote:
Elsa wrote:
Have also seen a lot of them in a little private reserve near Durban, called Tala.
They are beautiful antelope.


Are you sure those are not blesbok which look similar to bontebok.



Ooops yes, sorry :redface: On checking through the little brochure and before I get them into trouble, I see they were indeed Blesbok that we saw there. :?

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 Post subject: Antelope: Blesbok
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 3:36 pm 
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BLESBOK
(Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi)

Mass: 70 kg.
Shoulder height: 90 cm.
Tail length: 30-45 cm.
ID Pointers:
- Reddish-brown colour.
- Pale brown buttock patch.
- White blaze on muzzle broken by brown between eyes.
Lifespan: +/- 10 yrs.
Main predators:
1. Brown Hyaena
2. Caracal
Other predators:
1. Large snakes
Young also fall prey to:
1. Serval
2. Jackals
3. Eagles

DESCRIPTION:
- Higher shoulder than rump.
- Long pointed heads.
- Reddish-brown colour.
- White facial blaze broken by brown band between eyes.
- Buttocks pale.
Senses: Good sight, smell & hearing.
Horns: Both sexes carry horns which are simple & lyre-shaped. Ewe's horns are more slender. Horns are straw-coloured on upper ringed surface. Length: up to 51 cm.

BEHAVIOUR:
Diurnal. Herds are from 2-25 individuals with 1 dominant ram. Don't occupy the same home ranges continuosly & during dry winter months come together in large mixed herds.

REPRODUCTION:
From November to January with the peak in December, a single lamb of 6-7 kg is born after a gestation of 8 months.

FOOD:
Mostly grasses, but occasionaly browse.

HABITAT:
Open grassland within proximity to water.

Sources:
- Field Guide to the larger mammals of Africa by Chris & Tilde Swart.


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 3:37 pm 
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Found in the following SANParks:
- Cambedoo National Park.
- Mountain Zebra National Park.
- Golden Gate National Park.

Does anyone have a photo?


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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Mon Nov 06, 2006 2:28 am 
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At Cape Point
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(and of course at Bontebok National Park :wink:)

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