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Rare antelope sightings

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Skopsie
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby Skopsie » Tue Nov 03, 2009 9:47 pm

SW

To see a Reedbuck is already something, but to see Cheetas catching one is from out of this world!!! :mrgreen: Well done!!! :clap:

The cheetas look a bit inexperienced. Did they actually killed the Reedbuck?
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby SamoesaWoestyn » Wed Nov 04, 2009 9:13 am

They struggled a lot to bring him down but I must confess, it was the biggest Reedbuck I have ever seen! There were 4 cheetahs and the poor antelope could not math their speed!

It was our first Reedbuck sighting of the trip….

You can see some more photos on my TR
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Re: Mammal ID Needed?

Unread postby Mike1916 » Sun Nov 29, 2009 3:49 am

Mountain Reedbuck:
"The Mountain Reedbuck averages 75 cm at the shoulder, and weighs around 30 kg. It has a grey coat with a white underbelly and reddish-brown head and shoulders. The male has ridged horns of around 35 cm, which curve forwards"

Reedbuck:
Southern Reedbucks average 85 cm at the shoulder, and weigh around 70 kg. They have grey-brown coats with a white underbelly and black forelegs. Males have ridged horns of around 35 cm, which grow backwards and then curve forwards.

Oribi:
"Oribi grow to around 92–110 cm (36 to 43 inches) in length, with a shoulder height of 50–66 cm (20 to 26 inches) and weigh an average of 12–22 kg (26 to 49 lb). They can run at speeds of up to 40–50 km/h (25–31 mph). In captivity they have a lifespan of up to 14 years.

The back and upper chest is yellow to orange-brown. The chin, throat, chest, belly and rump are white. The tail is short and bushy, the upper side black or dark brown, and the under surface white. The white crescent-shaped band of fur above the eye is a characteristic that helps to distinguish this species from other similar-looking antelope. Below each ear is a large round black glandular patch, the nostrils are prominently red, and on the sides of the face are vertical creases that house the pre-orbital glands. These glands produce an odorous secretion that is used to mark the oribi's territory. Only males grow horns, which are slender and upright, ridged to about halfway up, the ends being smooth and pointed, with some of length 19 cm (7.5 inches) being recorded"

Sharpe's Grysbok:
"It is similar in size to the Gray Duiker, but has a stockier body and elongated fur over the hindquarters. It stands about 20" (45–60 cm) at the shoulders and weighs only 7–11.5 kg. Its coat is reddish-brown which is streaked with white; eye-rings, around mouth, throat and underside are off-white. The males have stubby horns, which are widely spaced. Sharpe's Grysbok has a short deep muzzle with large mouth and heavy molar (grinding) teeth. The short neck and face on a long-legged body result in a high-rump posture when browsing."

Female bushbuck:
The female has no horns and has a reddish brown coat with white spots and has a short bushy tail

Lichtenstein's Hartebeest:

"Lichtenstein's Hartebeest typically stand about 1.25 m (4 ft) at the shoulder and have a mass of around 150 kg (330 lb). Lichtenstein's Hartebeest are a red brown colour, which is lighter on the underbelly. The horns found on both sexes appear from the side to be shaped like the letter 'S' and appear from the front to be shaped like the letter 'O' with its upper portions missing. The horns are slightly ridged and reach over 0.5 m in length."

Common Duiker:
"Colouration of this species varies widely over its vast geographic range. There are thought to be as many as 19 subspecies ranging from chestnut in forested areas of Angola to grizzled gray in northern savannas and light brown shades in arid regions. It grows to about 20 inches (50 cm) in height and generally weighs 12 to 25 kg; although females are generally larger and heavier than their male counterparts. The male bears horns which can grow to 4.25 inches (11 cm) long."

Hope this will help you :pray:

Or here

Mountain Reedbuck

Oribi

Bushbuck
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anne-marie
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby anne-marie » Sun Feb 21, 2010 12:14 am

Lichtenstein's hartebeest

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22.10.09 around Shingwedzi :D
Last edited by anne-marie on Sun Feb 21, 2010 12:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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anne-marie
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby anne-marie » Sun Feb 21, 2010 12:21 am

Mountain Reedbuck

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6.11.09 around Lower Sabie
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby anne-marie » Sun Feb 21, 2010 12:26 am

Sable

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9.11.09 near Olifants dam (S36)
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p@m
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby p@m » Sun Feb 21, 2010 9:57 pm

Great sightings anne-marie :thumbs_up:

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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby BushFairy » Sat May 15, 2010 9:54 pm

Hi all :)

Not sure if you guys consider the Sharpe's Grysbok to be a 'rare antelope sighting'? But here are two pics I took in Kruger in September 2009

On the S39
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On the S41
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Last edited by BushFairy on Sat May 15, 2010 10:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby Richprins » Sun May 16, 2010 6:09 pm

Very rare indeed so far South, BushFairy (Timbavati and Gudzani areas). Could you be more specific?

:clap:

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BushFairy
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby BushFairy » Sun May 16, 2010 6:30 pm

Thanks Richprins :)

The first sighting was on the s39 near Leeubron and the second was on the s41 about 50m after the N'wanetsi river crossing (in other words, where the road crosses the dry river bed) - that's the stretch of s41 between the s100 and H6.

Hope that helps! We have seen grysbok along the Timbavati road in previous years, not often though!
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby BushFairy » Mon May 17, 2010 11:18 am

Here are some pics of Southern/Common Reedbuck taken on the H10 near the turn off to the Mlondozi loop and picnic spot - taken in september :) For those of you who haven't seen Reedbuck in Kruger before, I would definately recommend the H10 - we have often seen them along this road - just look carefully during the day - they are usually lying down and are quite camouflaged :)

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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby SamoesaWoestyn » Tue May 18, 2010 5:26 pm

Thanks for the photos Bush Fairy!
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby Bushbaby30 » Tue May 18, 2010 5:49 pm

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This sable we saw at the Transport dam

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On the Voortrekker road

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Tsessebe between Pretoriuskop and Phabeni gate

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Southern Reedbuck between Satara and Ngotso dam... These we see regularly!
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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby Richprins » Tue May 18, 2010 7:30 pm

Very lucky, Bushbaby! :dance:

Interesting the collar on the second sable! :hmz:

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Re: Rare antelope sightings

Unread postby SamoesaWoestyn » Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:56 pm

During our visit to KNP in July 2010, we were blessed with great Sable sightings!

This beautiful bull was waiting for us on the S36 near the S125 turnoff.

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These two were standing in the distance on the S145 near Talamati camp

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Rare Antelope Sightings!

Returning to Kruger in December 2013!!!


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