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Unread postPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:49 am 
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Location: PRETORIA
food chain - bottom up -
a. termite - ant - aardvark - leopard - man
b. leaves - impala - caracal - leopard - man
c. Shrimp - catfish - fish eagle - caracal - lion - man
d. cricket - scorpion - genet - martial eagle - caracal - lion - man


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 Post subject: Re: Food Chain Question
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:10 pm 
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sorry naomirsa, meant to answer this ages ago :redface:

as you most probably know the first trophic level of the food chain is the producers so lets take the sweet grasses as the producers, this is then eaten by the next trophic level which would be the impala (which are considered the "staple diet" of many predators) the primary consumers, these in turn are eaten by lion, ( the secondary consumers) the lion may die of old age, or become too ill to defend itself in which case it will then be eaten by hyena(tertiary consumer). The hyena may in turn die and will then be fed on by vultures and finally be broken down to simpler organic matter by detritus feeders such as maggots and finally to inorganic matter(future plant nutrients) by decomposers, and then it starts again when the grass absorbs the nutrients...
hope thats what you were asking?


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Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 4:26 pm 
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naomirsa
Also remember that there are many different food chains that are linked to other food chains (sometimes by a single spesies)
E.g. an aquatic food chain is linked by fish eating birds to a terrestial chain. There is actually not a simple food chain.It might look simple though.....
It is all about the flow of energy in different directions :shock:
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Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 7:51 pm 
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ok Pilane let's get technical :wink: :lol: it's then called a food web, I thought of writing one down but hey, that would need a few pages :shock: :lol:


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Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 9:40 pm 
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The transfer of food and energy from the plant source (producers) through a series of organisms (consumers) with repeated eating and being eaten is referred to as a food chain.
When different food chains are interconected they form a food web.The seperate links in a food chain are referred to as trophic levels. Producers (plants) occupy the first trophic level
and the consumers the second, third, fourth etc. levels.As one move up in the tropic levels the biomass and energy will decrease drastically as energy is lost as heat through each level.
On average the next level only stores 10% of the energy of the previous level.

Example:
Grass - 1St trophic level Biomass=100% (producer)
Mouse- 2nd trophic level Biomass=10% (Primary consumer)
Puffadder- 3rd trophic level Biomass= 1% (Secondary consumer)
Honey Badger 4th trophic level Biomass=0.1% (Tertriary consumer) and so on...


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 Post subject: What animals have you seen in culverts?
Unread postPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 12:59 am 
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There are many reports of hyenas being found using culverts, what other animals have you seen? LIC?
Image


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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 7:19 am 
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There used to be a leopard in the drainange pipe on the H6 exactly 6kms from the H1-3 turnoff.

Only other animals I have found in these pipes were hyenas.

Niknak, was that pic taken on the gravel loop between the Sabie river and the H11?

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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 7:38 am 
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I once saw a lion take out some small animal from the drainpipe on a nightdrive from Satara. Unfortunately we could not see what animal was caught, as he stayed in the opening of the pipe for quite some time.

We've seen him inspecting the drainpipes as he walked as if he knew there could be something in there.

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Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 6:02 pm 
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wildtuinman wrote:

Niknak, was that pic taken on the gravel loop between the Sabie river and the H11?


It was on the riverside loop on the section of road between Skukuza and the H12. There were lions, buffalo and this leopard on the loop on this occasion.


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Unread postPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2006 10:53 am 
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That is a very interesting little loop isn't it, one that we have only recently discovered but now never miss doing, altho we have never yet seen anything like you have seen Niknak. :roll:

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 Post subject: Migration
Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2006 1:16 pm 
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Migration
How about the animal migrations in Kruger. Does it happen like in the Serengeti ?


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Unread postPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2006 2:16 pm 
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It would appear so to a smaller scale, and not so accurately defined, but this is my theory, maybe others have facts.

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Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 7:33 am 
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Migration have been hampered by the border fences, but there are still migration between the open plains east of LS up towards the Satara area.

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 Post subject: Question about decomposers in Kruger
Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:36 pm 
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umm uhhh i didnt know where to put this so i put it here... sorry if its the wrong place. anywho...

i was looking for 2 decomposers in an african savannah biome and my main one is kruger national park so when i was looking up food chains and such, i found alot of animals, but at the end of the food chain its like.. a picture of fungi and labeled decomposer.

anyone happen to know any specific types of fungi or bacteria are there?

i was going to use termite as one of my two... because alot of places say theyre very important decomposers in the ecosystem, but some people say theyre scavengers so... i dunno.

any help would be greatly appreciated :D Thx!


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Unread postPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:27 pm 
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Don't forget about the important role the dungbeetles and other insects play. But in the end it's bacteria and fungi. It would surprise me if they were completely different from elsewhere in the world. Different family maybe, but still aunts and uncles.

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