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Unread postPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 10:29 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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Thanks for the heads up chaps:
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:thumbs_up:

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 Post subject:
Unread postPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:37 pm 
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Here are the photos of the black rhino I saw Saturday 9 August 2008.

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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 3:23 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Could someone please confirm whether or not this is a black rhino, as we were quite sure at the time, but the photos are not crystal clear as to the lip configuration. Taken in Kruger Aug. 31, 2008. Thanks!
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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 3:36 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Definitely a Blackie imo.

Just by judging the length of the neck and the general wear and tear on this specimen due to habitat diff. The name white originated from wide mouth rhino, your photo shows a more rounded mouth.


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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 3:25 pm 
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Location: Port Elizabeth
Just returned from a trip to Kruger.
And saw two very relaxed Black Rhino on two consecutive days.
It was a first for me to see them in Kruger :dance:

MJ, the guide at Lower Sabie, saw them 7 times in 5 days, so chances are that they will be seen again in the future.
Our first sighting of them was at about Midday and they were "Arguing" over a piece of shade under a tree not 50m from the road.
The obviously dominant one chased the other away, lay down and fell asleep.
The second one waited a while, and then moved in just behind the first one and lay right next to it in the shade.
It looked like they were cuddling :lol:

The next day, we saw them pretty much in the same spot, just out in the open (also sleeping) as it was fairly early and not too hot yet.

Anyway, I was really happy with the sightings and I hope some of you going in the near future will see these two.

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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:02 am 
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Virtual Ranger
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shangri-la wrote:
Hi all

I was just wondering is the only thing different between the white and black rhino the lip ????


No....the lip is just one diiference :wink:
White Rhino: square lip, it's a grazer, it's young always walk in front of them, when fully grown they are larger and heavier than their black cousin, tend to be less agressive, much more common. Furthermore there are also differences with regard to their debris (different food)

Black Rhino: hooked lip, it's a browser (eats mainly leaves), it's young always walk behind them, smaller than their cousin, can become very agressive/protective, quite elusive, not very common.

Here are the three (look at lip)

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Image

Don't blame me, I didn't take the pics myself (Was there, but no camera with me :redface: )

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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:19 pm 
They also approached the car and eventually crossed the road! :shock:

Mother and old calf!

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The calf charged the egret, with little effect! :shock:


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 Post subject: Re: Black Rhino and calf
Unread postPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2009 2:30 pm 
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Virtual Ranger
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Welcome to the forums bondm! :clap: :thumbs_up:

In december i also was fortunate enough to see my first black rhinos i kruger :dance: The wound that you saw is characteristic of black rhino and is caused by a parasitic worm of which a fly is the vector. The worm then causes a haemorrhagic type wound which often bleeds alot. Almost every black rhino is affected by it . :)

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 Post subject: Re: Black Rhino and calf
Unread postPosted: Mon Feb 23, 2009 2:44 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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We also saw a black rhino in June 2008 which also had a wound on its flank.
I was also worried that it was a wound caused by fighting etc, but also learnt it was due to the parasite.
I have attached our pic of the rhino, and tried to enlarge the wound (quality not great, it was just after 05h30 in the morning, light not great) so that you can compare how it looks to the wound on your blackie.

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2009 6:10 pm 
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Hi all you readers and viewers. Here is the picture of the Black Rhino and calf - I hopeImage

Yippee! Success. Thanks for that. (Dead easy when you know how)


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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 5:25 pm 
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Location: ...now or later on ?
Sorry to change the subject of the amazing pics but with regards to the parasite, what affects does it have on the rhino ? Apart from leaving nasty wounds.

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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 7:45 pm 
Hello, bentley!

Good question!

Obviously the effect is not severe, otherwise Black Rhino would disappear, as it seems universal...

It is a parasitic relationship, with the host (the rhino) not being damaged much.

Ironically, I saw a decrepit old rhino on its last legs at Mhlanganzwane Dam many years ago, WITHOUT the infection... :hmz:

One would be amazed at the amount of parasites virtually all wild mammals carry...it only starts to add up once the animal becomes old or weak..


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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2009 7:48 pm 
A funny anonymous story about a Black Rhino, from MANY years ago:

The plight of the Black Rhinoceros is, or course, due mostly to the value of its horn and the ferocious poaching that this engenders.
However, a contributory factor to the declining rhino population is the animals disorganized mating habits.
It seems that the female rhino only becomes receptive to the male’s attentions every three years or so, while the male only becomes interested in her at the same intervals.
This is a condition known quite appropriately as “Musth”.
The problem is one of synchronization, for their amorous inclinations do not always coincide.

In the early Sixties, I was invited, along with a host of journalists and other luminaries, to be present at an attempt by the Rhodesian Game and Tsetse Department to solve this problem of poor timing.
The idea was to capture a male rhino and induce him to deliver up that which could be stored until that day in the distant future when his mate’s fancy turned lightly to thoughts of love.

We departed for the Zambesi Valley in an impressive convoy of trucks and landrovers, counting in our midst none-other than the Director of the game department in person, together with his minions, a veterinary surgeon, an electrician and sundry other technicians, all deemed necessary to make the harvest.
The local game scouts had been sent out to scout the bush for the largest, most virile rhino they could find. They had done their job to perfection and led us to a beast at least the size of a small granite koppie with a horn on his nose considerably longer than my arm.
The trick was to get this monster into a robust mobile pen which had been constructed to accommodate him.

With the Director of the Game Department shouting frantic orders from the safety of the largest truck, the pursuit was on.
The tumult and the shouting were apocalyptic.
Clouds of dust flew in all directions, trees, and vegetation were destroyed, game scouts scattered like chaff, but finally the rhino had about a litre of narcotics shot into his rump and his mood became dreamy and benign.
With forty black game guards heaving and shoving and the Director still shouting orders from the truck, the rhino was wedged into his cage, and stood there with a happy grin on his face.

At this stage, the Director deemed it safe to emerge from the cab of his truck and he came amongst us resplendent in starched and immaculately ironed bush jacket with a colourful silk scarf at this throat.
With an imperial gesture, he ordered the portable electric generator to be brought forward and positioned behind the captured animal.
This was a machine which was capable of lighting up a small city and was equipped with two wheels that made it resemble a roman chariot.
The director climbed up on the generator to better address us.
We gathered around attentively while he explained what was to happen next.

It seemed that the only way to get what we had come for was to introduce an electrode into the rhino’s rear end and deliver a mild electric shock, no more than a few volts, which would be enough to pull his trigger for him.
The director gave another order and the veterinary surgeon greased something that looked like an acoustic torpedo and which was attached to the generator with sturdy insulated wires.
He then went up behind the somnolent beast and thrust it up him to a full arms length, at which the rhino opened his eyes very wide indeed.

The veterinary and his two assistants now moved into position with a large bucket and assumed expectant expressions.
We, the audience, crowded closer so as not to miss a single detail of the drama.
The director still mounted on the generator trailer, nodded to the electrician who threw the switch and chaos reigned.
In the subsequent departmental enquiry the blame was placed squarely on the shoulders of the electrician. It seems that in the heat of the moment his wits had deserted him and instead of connecting up his apparatus to deliver a gentle 5 volts, he had crossed his wires and the rhino received a full 500 volts up his rear end.
2
His reaction was spectacular.
Four tons of rhinoceros shot six feet straight up in the air.
The cage, made of great timber baulks, exploded into its separate pieces and the rhinoceros now very much awake, took off at a gallop.
We, the audience, were no less spritely.
We took to the trees with alacrity.
This was the only occasion on which I have ever been passed by two journalists half way up a mopane tree. From the top branches we beheld an amazing sight, for the chariot was still connected to the rhinoceros per rectum and the director of the game department was still mounted upon it, very much like Ben Hur, the charioteer.

As they disappeared from view, the rhinoceros was snorting and blowing like a steam locomotive and the Director was clinging to the front rail of his chariot and howling like the north wind which only encouraged the beast to greater speed.

The story has a happy ending for the following day after the director had returned hurriedly to his office in Salisbury, another male rhinoceros was captured and caged and this time the electrician got his wiring right.

I can still see the rhinoceros’s expression of surprised gratification as the switch was thrown.
You could almost hear him think to himself. “Oh Boy! I didn’t think this was going to happen to me for at least another three years”


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 Post subject: Re: Hook-lipped Rhinoceros
Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:27 am 
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Saturday 27June 2009 at 13:15.
He/She was feeding next to the road and was very relaxed and even crossed the road behind a car without any problems.

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 Post subject: Black Rhino
Unread postPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:51 pm 
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Junior Virtual Ranger
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Location: Durban Kwazulu Natal SA
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Ive been trying to decide on this one for a while black or white its attitude tells me black as it charged at me from 60m away but stopped short at about 20m .


Edited RosemaryH Resize Image


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